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Last Update: June 1, 2005

 

35th Annual Meeting of the Husserl Circle

 

University College Dublin

 

(with the support of the Humanities Institute of Ireland,

the Faculty of Human Sciences and the Dept. of Philosophy, UCD)

 

9-12 June 2005

 

 

All sessions take place in the Seminar Room, Humanities Institute of Ireland (HII) Building, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4

 

Thursday, June 9th:

8:30-9:00 Registration and Tea/Coffee

Session I Moderator: Dermot Moran (University College Dublin)

9:00-9:15 Official Welcome (Dr. Hugh Brady, President, University College Dublin; and Prof. Anne Fuchs, Associate Director, HII)

9:15-9:45 Paper 1: Lester Embree (Florida Atlantic University) ‘Building Up to Animism: Sketch of the Major Discovery and methodology in the Revision of the Fifth of Husserl’s Cartesianische Meditationen developed by Dorion Cairns’

9:45-10.00 Respondent: Elizabeth A. Behnke (Study Project in Phenomenology of the Body)

10:00-10:15 Discussion

10:15-10:30 Break

10:30-11:00 Paper 2: Jeremy H. Smith (Otterbein College, Westerville, Ohio), ‘Hopkins, Husserl and Beauty: Towards a Phenomenological Aesthetics’

11.00-11.15 Respondent: Tim Davis (Community College of Baltimore County)

11:15-11:30 Discussion

11.30-11.45 Break

Moderator: Brian O’Connor (University College Dublin)

11:45-12:15 Paper 3: Don Ihde (Stony Brook University), ‘Phenomenology + Pragmatism = Postphenomenology’

12:15-12.30 Respondent: Eileen Brennan (University College Dublin)

12.30-12:45 Discussion

12:45-2:00 pm Lunch

Session II: Husserl on Perception, Perceptual Content and Meaning Moderator:

2:00-2:30 Paper 4: Rosemary Rizo-Patron Lerner (Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Lima), ‘Husserl’s Early Phenomenology of Perception’

2:30-2:45 Respondent: John Drummond (Fordham University)

2:45-3:00 Discussion

3:00-3:15 Break

3:15-3:45 Paper 5: Dan J. Dwyer (Xavier University, Ohio), ‘Preconceptual Content in Perception: Husserl and McDowell’

3:45-4.00 Respondent: Michael Barber (St. Louis University)

4:00-4:15 Discussion

4:15-4:30 Break

4:30-5:00 Paper 6: Steve Crowell (Rice University), ‘Phenomenological Immanence and Semantic Externalism: A Rapprochement’

5:00-5:15 Respondent: Lilian Alweiss (Trinity College Dublin)

5:15-5:30 Discussion

Moderator: Burt Hopkins (Seattle University)

5:30-6:00 Paper 7: Ivan Chvatik (Center for Theoretical Study, Charles University, Prague), ‘Jan Patočka and his Concept of an “A-subjective Phenomenology”’

6:00-6:15 Respondent: James R. Mensch (St. Francis Xavier University, Canada)

6:15-6.30 Discussion

6:30-7:30pm Reception (Staff Common Room, Newman Building) Welcome by Dr. Gerard Casey, Head, Department of Philosophy

Friday, June 10:

8:30-9:00 Coffee/Tea

Session IV Husserl’s Ethics

Moderator: Jeremy H. Smith (Otterbein College, Westerville, Ohio)

9:00-9:30 Paper 8: Tanja Staehler (University of Sussex), ‘A Renewal of Reason: Husserl’s Ethics a propos Kant and Hegel’

9:30-9:45 Respondent: Tim Mooney (University College Dublin)

9:45-10:00 Discussion

10:00-10:30 Paper 9: John Drummond (Fordham University), ‘Internalism and Externalism in Ethics: A Phenomenological Reflection’

10:30-10.45 Respondent: Tom Nenon (University of Memphis)

10:45-11:00 Discussion

11:00 -11:15 Break

Session V Book Session: Edmund Husserl, Fantasy, Image-Consciousness, Memory, trans. John Brough, Husserl Collected Works XI (Dordrecht: Springer, 2005)

Moderator: Rosemary Rizo-Patron Lerner (Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Lima)

11.15-11:45 Paper 10: Rudolf Bernet (Director, Husserl-Archief, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven), ‘Consciousness of the Absent and the Fictitious’

11:45-12:00 Respondent: Steve Crowell (Rice University)

12:00-12:15 Discussion

12:15-12:45 Paper 11: John Brough (Georgetown U.), ‘Image Consciousness’

12:45-1:00 Respondent: Julia Jansen (University College Cork)

1:00-1:15 Discussion

1:15-2:45 Lunch

Session VI Moderator: Felix O’ Murchadha (National University of Ireland, Galway)

2:45-3:15 Paper 12: Ian Leask (Mater Dei Institute, Dublin), ‘First Impressions Reconsidered: Some Comments on the Levinasian Critique of Husserl’

3:15-3:30 Discussion

3:30-3:45 Break

3:45-4:15 Paper 13: Abraham Stone (Chicago), ‘The Object as Indeterminable X. Husserl vs. Natorp, Carnap and Levinas’

4:15-4:30 Respondent: Christian Lotz (University of Kansas).

4:30-4.45 Discussion

5:00-5:30 Husserl Circle Business Meeting (members only)

5:30-6:30 Reception (Staff Common Room, Newman Building)

Saturday, June 11:

8:30-9:00 Coffee/Tea

Session VII:

Moderator:

9:00-9:30 Paper 14: Harry Reeder (U. of Texas, Arlington), ‘Language and the Law of Oriented Constitution’

9:30-9:45 Respondent: Tim Stapleton (Loyola University, Maryland)

9.45-10.00 Discussion

10:00-10:15 Break

10:15-10:45 Paper 15: Michael Barber (St. Louis U.), ‘Interpersonal Perspectives, Intentionality and Language: Husserl and the Brandom/McDowell Debate’

10:45-11:00 Respondent: Kevin Mulligan (Université de Genčve, Switzerland)

11.10-11:15 Discussion

11.15-11:30 Break

Session VIII

Moderator: Tim Mooney (University College Dublin)

11:30-12:00 Paper 16: Michael Kelly (Boston College), ‘Bergson’s “Idealistic Concession”: Transformed Idealism and Husserlian Phenomenology’

12.00-12:15 Respondent: Len Lawlor (University of Memphis)

12:15-12:30 Discussion

12:30-2:00 LUNCH

2:00 Session IX

Moderator: Maria Baghramian (University College Dublin)

2:00-2:30 Paper 17: Kevin Mulligan (Université de Genčve, Switzerland), ‘Acts, Correlates and their Connexions’

2:30-2:45 Respondent: Nicolas de Warren (Wellesley College)

2:45-3:00 Discussion

3:00-3:15 Break

Session X Husserl’s Philosophy of Arithmetic

3:15-3:45 Paper 18: Burt Hopkins (Seattle University), ‘Husserl’s Psychologism, and Critique of Psychologism, Revisited’

3:45-4:00 Respondent: Abraham Stone (University of Chicago)

4:00-4:15 Discussion

4:15-4:30 Break

4:30-5:00 Paper 19: Gina Zavota (Kent State University), ‘Omnitemporality, Participation, and Husserl’s Escape from Platonism’

5:00-5:15 Respondent: John Brough (Georgetown University)

5:15-5:45 Paper 20: Stefania Centrone (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy), ‘Husserl on the concepts of ‘operation’ and ‘system of operations’

5:45-6:00 Respondent: Elizabeth Rigal (Centre Nationale de Recherche Scientifique, Paris)

6:00-6:15 Discussion

6:15-7:30 Reception

Sunday, June 12

Session XI Husserl’s Crisis Moderator: Dermot Moran (University College Dublin)

9:00-9.30 Paper 21: George Heffernan (Augustinian College, Andover, MA), ‘The Phenomenological Protreptic: Husserl’s Passionate Exhortation to Transcendental Philosophy, Elucidated by means of the Rhetorical Topos 'Crisis'’

9:30-9:45 Respondent: Joanna Hodge (Manchester Metropolitan University)

9:45-10:00 Discussion

10:00-10:10 Break

Session XII Body, Flesh and Gender

Moderator: Lester Embree (Florida Atlantic University)

10:10-10:40. Paper 22: Elizabeth Behnke (Study Project in the Phenomenology of the Body), ‘Bodily Protentionality: An Experiment in Phenomenological Practice (VI)’

10:40-10:55 Respondent: Tanja Staehler (University of Sussex) 10:55-11:10 Discussion

11:10-11:20 Break

11:20-11:50 Paper 23: Linda Fisher (Central European University, Budapest, Hungary) ‘Gendered Phenomenology’

11:50-12:05 Respondent: Corinne Painter (Emporia State U.) 12:05-12:20 Discussion

12:20-12:30 Break

Session XIII

Moderator: Don Ihde (Stony Brook University)

12:30-1:00 Paper 24: James Mensch (St. Francis Xavier U., Canada) ‘Artificial Intelligence and the Phenomenology of Flesh’

1:00-1:15 Respondent: Gary Banham (Manchester Metropolitan University) 1.15-1:30 Discussion

1:30 pm CLOSE OF CONFERENCE

 

Update, June 1, 2005

List of Irish Pubs

 

4 Dame Lane 4 Dame Lane tel 01/679 0291. Announced by burning braziers just along the lane from the Stag's Head, this airy, minimalist bar/club probably has the stylistic edge over its bare brickwork and wood rivals. There're good tunes, anything from hip-hop and jazz to chilled ragamuffin, and a dance floor upstairs. Daily until 2.30am, admission charge after 11pm.
 

The Chocolate Bar Old Harcourt Street Train Station, Harcourt St. Nestling in the armpit of one of Dublin's most stylish nightclubs, POD, this Gaudí-inspired watering-hole is where young hip Dubliners congregate to swig alcopops and imported bottled beers.
 

Davy Byrne's 21 Duke St, off Grafton St. Davy Byrne's "moral pub" receives a particularly honourable mention in Joyce's epic novel as the place where Leopold Bloom takes a break from his famous perambulation across Dublin for a Gorgonzola sandwich and a glass of Burgundy. Over the years it's been extensively redecorated as a lounge bar in a mix of Art Deco and other vaguely Modernist styles, but it's still a good place for a quiet drink and perhaps a plate of seafood.
 

Doheny and Nesbitt 5 Baggot St Lower. Archetypal Dublin pub – the tiny, atmospheric, smoke-filled front room looks as if it has hardly changed for a hundred years. Always packed, but there are cosy snugs at the back, and at weekends, a slightly less hectic lounge open upstairs.
 

The Globe 11 South Great George's St. Outrageously popular with the sassy and fashion-conscious twenty-somethings of Dublin, this loud and lively bar is invariably packed at weekends, and busy every night. It's pleasantly wood-panelled and discreetly lit, which makes it the perfect chill-out room for Rí-Rá.
 

Grogan's 15 William St South. Smoky, eccentric haunt of literary types down through the years, where conversation dominates. Good drinks at relatively reasonable prices; head here if you like your beer without the frills.
 

The International Bar 23 Wicklow St. Another great drinking establishment that has changed little over the decades. Upstairs hosts comedy, music and theatre in a small, informal venue.
 

Kehoe's 9 South Anne St, off Grafton St. Until a few years ago the family whose name adorns this wonderful old establishment lived upstairs, reputedly the last resident publicans in the city centre. To the collective relief of Dublin's more discerning drinkers, the new owners have scarcely touched the mahogany interiors, and there are few happier places to be than in the innermost seat of the tiny snug, with a pint settling on the table in front of you.
 

The Long Hall 51 South Great George's St. Dark and wonderfully ornate Victorian pub, with friendly staff and a good pint of Guinness.
 

McDaid's 3 Harry St, off Grafton St. A literary pub, this is where Brendan Behan used to drown his talent in Guinness. It remains more or less intact, and despite now selling its own T-shirts, it's still popular with locals, with overspill seating upstairs for when the crush gets too mighty.
 

Messrs Maguire 1–2 Burgh Quay. Microbrewery pub that's not quite as classy as The Porter House, but well worth trying out. Centrally located overlooking the river, with numerous floors and mezzanines off a grand, winding staircase. Mon, Tues & Sun until 12.30am, Wed–Sat until 2.30am.
 

Modern Green Bar 31 Wexford St. Handy for Mono, this lively, friendly student bar does exactly what it says on the tin, with a splash of primary red paint thrown in. Bright, simple booths and good DJs most nights of the week.
 

Mulligan's 8 Poolbeg St. Mulligan's traditionally served the best Guinness in Dublin; many people now acknowledge that honour to have passed to the Guinness Storehouse, but this place still has its partisans.
 

O'Neill's 2 Suffolk St. This rambling pub with plenty of quiet corners has been a home from home for generations of students and lecturers from nearby Trinity College. Also much favoured as a lunching spot by office workers, who come for the sandwiches and healthy portions of buffet food.
 

SoSuMe 64 South Great George's St. Generations of tellers who worked in this lofty former bank are no doubt turning in their graves at its oriental-themed reincarnation, whose punning name belongs firmly to the Celtic Tiger. But it's a lively enough spot, and the theme, with its Buddhas, dragons and botanical prints, is attractive but not too in-your-face. Wed–Sat until 2.30am, Sun until 1am.
 

Stag's Head 1 Dame Court, a tiny turning off Dame Street almost opposite the Central Bank. Hard to find – a mosaic set in the pavement on Dame Street alerts you to the tiny alleyway it's located in – but worth it when you get there: inside it's all mahogany, stained glass and mirrors. Good pub lunches, too, and a friendly atmosphere.
 

Toners 139 Baggot St Lower. Dark, cosy pub with a refreshingly plain interior. Snugs, with glazed partitions, for making and breaking confidences.

 

Update, April 15, 2005

 

Campus-Map as pdf-file available here

 

Update, April 15, 2005

 

Husserl Circle,

University College Dublin 9-12 June 2005

 

Dear Colleagues:

 

Included with this mailing you will find a draft of this year’s program. The cut-off date for booking the Jurys Montrose Hotel in Dublin at the special conference rate has now been extended to May 7th 2005. Also, a reminder that Jury’s Montrose hotel has set up an booking form that can be downloaded from the UCD Philosophy Department website or from the following link:

http://www.ucd.ie/philosop/documents/UCD%20Husserl%20Circle%20%20Booking%20Form[1].htm

The hotel has indicated a preference for people sending the form by fax/airmail letter, but inquiries may be sent directly to Mary Meehan (mary_Meehan@jurysdoyle.com). Hotel bookings need to be made by 7 May 2005 in order to avail of these rates. Currently, the hotel is holding 40 rooms at that rate for Husserl Circle members. The Jurys Montrose hotel is directly opposite the main entrance of the campus and from the hotel it is a relaxed 10 minute walk to the Humanities Institute building where the meetings will take place. I am attaching a map of the campus. The Aircoach bus from the airport goes directly to the Montrose Hotel (specify the ‘Sandyford’ coach — but the driver will ask you where you want to go), every 15 minutes. Please note that Monday 6th June is a public holiday (‘The June Bank Holiday’) and banks and public offices are closed on that day.

I look forward to seeing you in Dublin in June 2005.

 

Sincerely,

Dermot Moran

Convenor

 

Letter from the HC Secretary
February 16, 2005

 

 

Dear Colleague,

 

Mid-winter greetings!

In addition to including the 2005 announcement of the annual dues for membership in the Husserl Circle, this communication includes undated information on our next meeting (June 9-12) from its Convenor, Prof. Dermot Moran, University College Dublin and information on the second meeting of the Organization of Phenomenological Organizations (OPO).

Dues: Included as an enclosure you will find a 2005 dues statement that reflects the current status of your membership. NB: You may now renew your Husserl Circle dues with your credit card. To do so, go to www.husserlcircle.org, click on the PayPal link and follow the simple instructions.

OPO:   The second meeting of meeting of the Organization of Phenomenological Organizations will held over Monday, August 15th through Saturday, August 20, 2005 at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú in Lima, Peru. Professor Rosemary Rizo-Patron will be the local coordinator. The Husserl Circle is a member of OPO; if you are interested in representing (at your own expense, alas) the Circle at this meeting, please contact me.

With best wishes,

Burt Hopkins

Secretary

bhopkins@seattleu.edu

 

 

Husserl Circle,

University College Dublin 9-12 June 2005

 

February 16, 2005

 

Dear Members and Friends of the Husserl Circle,

 

The 35th Annual Meeting of the Husserl Circle will take place in University College Dublin from Thursday, 9th June through Sunday, 12th June 2005. This is a reminder that the deadline for submissions is March 15, 2005. Papers should have a reading time of no more than 30 minutes. Please send the complete paper (or a substantial abstract) directly to me at Dermot.moran@ucd.ie (by e‑mail attachment, airmail, or fax) so that it is received by the deadline.  Decisions will be announced by 15 April 2005.

 

I would also appreciate if those planning to attend the conference would indicate to me their willingness to serve as respondents or moderators.

 

At this time, I want to give more information about travel and accommodation.

 

Accommodation

The nearest hotel to the UCD Belfield campus is the Jury’s Montrose Hotel (http://www.jurys.com/ireland/doyle_montrose.htm), a comfortable three-star hotel directly opposite the main gate of the campus. I recommend the Montrose Hotel to conference delegates as most convenient and very good value. Dublin is an expensive destination, currently one of the most expensive capital cities in Europe.

 

The Montrose Hotel conference rates are as follows:

standard single room                                       €  94.00 euro

standard twin room                                         €104.00 euro

  standard double room                                     €104.00 euro

Executive supplement (for a larger room)       €  20.00 euro

These rates are per room per night inclusive of full Irish breakfast, service charge (15%) and Value Added Tax (VAT) at 12.5%. The Jury’s Montrose hotel has set up an booking form that can be downloaded from the UCD Philosophy Department website or from the following link:

http://www.ucd.ie/philosop/documents/UCD%20Husserl%20Circle%20%20Booking%20Form[1].htm

The hotel has indicated a preference for people sending the form by fax/airmail letter, but inquiries may be sent directly to Mary Meehan (mary_Meehan@jurysdoyle.com). Hotel bookings need to be made by 8 April 2005 in order to avail of these rates.

 

Room Sharing

The hotel has indicated that it can arrange for two guests who are willing to share a twin room. Those wishing to share should indicate that on their forms, but it would be preferable to arrange in advance with someone you know and simply put both names down on the booking form. I cannot be responsible for ‘matching’ people (the hotel will charge the single room rate if a ‘twin’ is occupied solely by one person). Please send any queries to Mary Meehan (mary_Meehan@jurysdoyle.com) at the hotel in the first instance. The hotel can make special provision for larger groups (e.g. couples traveling with children, etc).

 

I strongly recommend that conference participants use the Jury’s Montrose hotel. These rates represent good value as a cursory internet perusal of hotel rates in Dublin will show.

 

Other Hotels

Dublin is a capital city with many hotels (including major chains –Westin, Radisson, Conrad, Four Seasons), distinguished hotels (The Shelbourne, Berkeley Court, Westbury), posh boutique hotels (The Clarence, The Fitzwilliam, The Morrison, Longfields, The Schoolhouse) and reasonably priced conveniently located hotels (Jury’s Christchurch Inn, Jury’s Inn Customhouse). If you wish to stay in the city centre you would be advised to stay in one of those hotels.

 

UCD Village Apartments

I have also reserved a number of single rooms (organized in 4-bedroom self-catering apartments with shared bathroom) in the UCD Village, modern dorm style accommodation on campus for approximately €36 euro a night per person. This represents budget accommodation but is adequate. The main drawback is that these residences are located in the middle of the campus, and although served by a small supermarket/convenience store, have very limited facilities. Breakfast is available on the campus Monday to Friday in the Main Restaurant but not at the weekends. More details are available on the UCD website.

 

Bed & Breakfasts

There are also a number of B&Bs in the area of the university, costing approximately 60 euro per person per night. I have put a list of convenient B&Bs on the UCD conference website.

 

Flights

The Irish national airline is Aer Lingus (www.aerlingus.com), which has an arrangement with American Airlines, but a number of US carriers fly directly into Dublin including Delta, US Air and Continental.

 

Getting to the Campus

The campus of University College Dublin (http://www.ucd.ie/) is located in Belfield, a south Dublin suburb about 3 miles from Dublin city centre (O’Connell St. is usually regarded as the centre). The cheapest and most convenient way to get to UCD from Dublin Airport (which is on the northside of Dublin) is to take the Aircoach bus (http://www.aircoach.ie/), which departs from Dublin Airport (Sandyford route) every 15 minutes and which stops directly in front of the UCD campus beside the Jury’s Montrose Hotel. The fare is currently €7.00 euro single (€12.00 return) and the journey takes about 40 minutes.

 

Taxis are metered and are more expensive (approx. €30-40 euro, depending on traffic).

 

Dublin Bus (http://www.dublinbus.ie/home/) runs a number of buses from Dublin Airport to the city centre (including the 746 which serves UCD Belfield Campus). The numbers 46A and 10 buses run regularly from the centre of town to the campus. Passengers need exact change (average fare is €1.50 each way from City Centre to UCD Belfield campus).

 

For those wishing to hire a car, it is often cheaper to do this on the web from outside Ireland. All the usual companies operate (Hertz, Avis, Budget, Enterprise, etc). There is free car parking on the UCD campus and at the Montrose Hotel.

 

Tourism, Sight-Seeing, Entertainment

Dublin is a vibrant city. In recent years it has become very cosmopolitan and European with lots of fancy restaurants, bars and cafes. A helpful site for information on restaurants, events, etc., is http://www.indublin.ie/. I find the Timeout guides helpful, see www.timeout.com/travel/dublin.

 

Eurozone

Ireland is in the euro zone. Up-to-date exchange rates for the euro/dollar/etc. can be found on http://www.x-rates.com/.

 

For further information on any aspect of the conference, please contact the Philosophy Dept Executive Assistant, Ms. Margaret Brady (Margaret.brady@ucd.ie), tel. +353-1-7168267.

I look forward to seeing you in Dublin in June 2005.

 

Sincerely, 

Dermot Moran

Convenor

 

35th Annual Meeting of the Husserl Circle

E-mail address: Dermot.Moran@ucd.ie  

Telephone: +353-1-716-8267

Fax: +353-1-2693469

 

 

Letter of the Secretary, September 2003
Information, Husserl Circle Meeting, Dublin 2005


 

 

September 8, 2004

 

 Dear Colleague,

 

The 34rd annual meeting of the Husserl Circle at Georgetown University this past June in Washington DC was an immense success. Special thanks are in order to Convenor John Brough, who did a superb job of assembling a first-rate program and attending to the every need of the 41 members and friends of the Circle in attendance. The level of presentation and discussion was once again very high. Four European colleagues participated in the Husserl Circle for the first-time: Joanna Hodge (Manchester Metropolitan University, UK) Juha Himanka (University of Helsinki, Finland), Henning Peucker (Cologne, Germany) and Gary Banham (Manchester Metropolitan University, UK).

All the above named were duly elected into the Circle at the Business meeting. In addition, the following were also welcomed into the Circle as new members:

Daniel Dwyer, Xavier University

Richard Khuri, Independent Scholar

Heath Massey, University of Memphis

John McCarthy, The Catholic University of America

Matthew Morgan, Duquesne University

Abraham Stone, University of Chicago

The members in attendance voted to accept Christian Lotz’s invitation to host the 2006 meeting of the Circle at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas.

The 2005 meeting of the Circle will take place at University College, Dublin, Ireland, June 9-12. A letter from the Convenor, Dermot Moran, is enclosed. Information about the meeting will periodically be updated on the Circle’s web site (www.husserlcircle.org).

The following items were discussed and approved at the Annual Business Meeting by the members in attendance:

Adding the PayPal online credit card payment system (which is a secure and convenient option for annual dues payment) to the Husserl Circle web page. (The system has been added and is currently operative.)

Implementing the following policy, effective immediately: Members must be current with their dues in the two years prior to the year of the annual meeting to be eligible to be on the program; e.g., for 2005 dues would have be current from 2003-05.

With best wishes,

Burt Hopkins

Secretary

 

bhopkins@seattleu.edu


 


September 8, 2004

 

Dear Members and Friends of the Husserl Circle,

I am pleased to announce that 35th Annual Meeting of the Husserl Circle will take place in University College Dublin from Thursday, 9th June through Sunday, 12th June 2005.

Should you wish to participate in the meeting by delivering a paper, the deadline for submissions is March 15, 2005. Papers should have a reading time of no more than 30 minutes. Anyone wishing to submit a paper should send it (or a substantial abstract) directly to me (either by e‑mail attachment, airmail or fax) so that it is received by the deadline.  Happily, the number of submitted papers has been growing with each meeting, but that also means that decisions may have to be made about which papers to include.  Decisions will be announced by mid-April 2005.

The campus of University College Dublin (http://www.ucd.ie/) is located in Belfield, a south Dublin suburb about 3 miles from Dublin city centre. The cheapest and most convenient way to get to UCD from Dublin Airport (which is on the northside of Dublin) is to take the Aircoach bus (http://www.aircoach.ie/), which departs from Dublin Airport (Sandyford route) every 15 minutes and which stops directly in front of the UCD campus beside the Jury’s Montrose Hotel. The fare is currently 6 euro single and the journey takes about 40 minutes. Taxis are more expensive (approx. 30-40 euro) but faster. Dublin Bus runs a number of buses from Dublin Airport to the city centre. For those wishing to hire a car, it is often cheaper to do this on the web from outside Ireland. There is free car parking on campus for those arriving by car.

As a European capital city, Dublin can be quite expensive (for more information, visit the Dublin Tourism website: http://www.visitdublin.com/).  There is a range of hotels, guesthouses, and bed & breakfasts at all levels. Visitors who want to see the sights may want to opt for a city-centre hotel. I have reserved a number of rooms in the Jury’s Montrose Hotel (http://www.jurys.com/ireland/doyle_montrose.htm), a comfortable three star hotel directly opposite the main gate of the campus.  The conference rate currently is approximately 100 euro per room per night (including full Irish breakfast, service charge of 15% and VAT tax, currently at 13.5%). I have also reserved a number of single rooms (organized in 4-bedroom self-catering apartments with shared bathroom) in the UCD Village, modern dorm style accommodation on campus for approximately 40 euro a night. This represents budget accommodation but is adequate. There are also a number of B&Bs in the area of the university, costing approximately 60 euro per person per night. Details of the exact rates and availability will be posted on the Husserl Circle website (http://www.husserlcircle.org/) by the end of February.  Up-to-date exchange rates for the euro/dollar/etc. can be found on http://www.x-rates.com/.

For further information on the conference or if you wish to reserve a room in the UCD Village, please contact the Philosophy Dept Executive Assistant, Ms. Margaret Brady (Margaret.brady@ucd.ie), tel. +353-1-7168267.

 

I look forward to seeing you in Dublin in June 2005.

Sincerely,

 

Dermot Moran

Professor and Convenor

35th Annual Meeting of the Husserl Circle

 

Mailing Address: 

Professor Dermot Moran

Philosophy Dept.,

University College Dublin

Dublin 4, Ireland

 

E-mail address: Dermot.Moran@ucd.ie

Telephone: +353-1-716-8267

Fax: +353-1-2693469

 



 

 
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